Thieves I tellya

(just another brick off the wall in the dismantling of godlessness)

The interpretive rights of scripture do not belong to liars and thieves; to be sure, that uncompromising and ever so sharp monarch of books bloodies the hands of they who would trifle with its sacred contents, thereby exposing the proud, the many, most even, from the few and soft of heart who bow to the revelation of Almighty God.

A fool may fear an earthworm, an ant, a black snake, a butterfly, or a harmless spider, yet have not one ounce of fear in his body toward He who gave the spider legs like an octopus, the ant a work ethic second to none, and a worm who irrigates the earth with his passages.

The FEAR of God however is not your garden variety ‘ooh, yuck, eek, shriek,’ but a posture of mind and heart which humbly recognizes and submits to the owner of the alphabet, the originator of arithmetic, and the supplier of all storehouses of wisdom and knowledge.

Got that ye skeptic? Your wisdom and knowledge is borrowed. You are not smart enough to stretch the lines out upon earth’s boundaries. You are not smart enough to devise a plan that keeps the four winds in place. You have not one whit of engineering sense to structure the great ice walls. You are embarrassingly incompetent to make a tornado, a hurricane, a seismic shock from below, or give directions to the lightning. You are clueless as to the fountains of the great deep, discovered a few years ago, but mentioned so casually in Genesis oh so many thousands of years ago.  God is the true Scientist.

Modern ‘Science’ is a snare and a delusion with pretended smarts and fancy data theories which if was food, a man would starve in a week. Godless science is evil to the core, and its proponents grasshoppers who cannot leap over a peanut. (true science is the correct revelation of creation, using of course, facts, our senses, things testable and repeatable, and let’s not overlook common sense)

Yet, still, you do not fear God. You do not give Him the courtesy that you give to the eagle in flight, as you look upon its majestic awe and effortless flight. WHERE pray tell did you get such a brain that commands you to look upon creation with such disdain? Not from the Creator, so then where?

Is this then an exaggeration when I say  ‘you look upon creation with such disdain?’ Actually, it is not strong enough. We have water as the drink of life, yet you think the fountain of youth resides in pretended science and perpetual theories which provide endless questions while avoiding a million answers already given, so yeah, a world of water is a daily indictment against the stout of heart who refuse to give God thanks.

Yet what does God do? He giveth more water. He giveth more grace. He giveth to they who are both unthankful and unworthy. THIS is the God we reverentially fear because He is an awesome God.  And oh there is this: the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.

Still refuse to acknowledge Him? You sir, ma’am, are most unwise. You say He does not exist while giving you every bit of evidence and proof? You sir, ma’am are a liar. Put THAT on your resume in capital letters. You want believers to be like you, free in the mind of life’s owner so you can pretend you are truly advanced, sooo unlike the morons who built the great pyramids and brass musical instruments long before Herb Alpert puckered his lips?  You sir, ma’am, are a thief. And Giza condemns our ignorance perfectly.

Don’t be a liar and a thief. But who can boast of interpretive rights to scripture? No one. Boasting is not a good plan. There is however this thing called reading and understanding, which takes into consideration first, that God is, and that His word is good, and secondly, that the human heart is built in such a way that it recognizes that the voice of nature, the level, the plumb-line, and the compass, all attest to the precision and truth of scripture, as it is, and as it should be.

But go ahead and argue. Your gripe will not be with me.

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About ColorStorm

Blending the colorful issues of life with the unapologetic truth of scripture, while adding some gracious ferocity.
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12 Responses to Thieves I tellya

  1. Doug says:

    I follow certain Conservative bloggers simply to stay apprised of opposing opinion; I don’t have all the answers on anything in life but it’s the humanist part of me that keeps the quest alive within me. Sometimes I do indeed modify my own opinion based on the opinions of others. But more often than not, the Conservative blogs also contain an equal amount of religious indulgence. When one “follows” one often gets the chaff with the wheat. I’m not complaining, mind you (and no one would care even if I was), but I do attempt to read whatever falls into my email notification with some level of interest before I either dismiss commenting or choose to comment further.
    But the reason for this comment is simply to present the observation that when I receive the posts with religious discourse… regardless of author… (i.e., you here, IB at InsanityBites, Tom at CitizenTom, and others) I find myself having to devote a fair amount of re-reading time to get passed the mental “WTF?” confusion. What follows then are my own doubts that perhaps I need to be more “religious” in some form to understand a lot of what’s being posted; as if understanding what’s being posted one has to accept the secret handshake of understanding somewhere. “If you read the damn Bible more, Dougie-boy, you’d know what they are talking about.” voice in my head.
    To which I mentally reply to myself, “Self, I’m not a complete religious dork; raised Lutheran, Sunday school-trained, choir boy (never abused, btw), confirmation classes, and while I can’t reference line and verse I do know the major stories and their application. So what am I missing here?”, I generally get no reply to that; no signs; burning bushes don’t appear, I don’t hear celestial hosts, Morgan Freeman’s voice or Charleton Heston’s echo. Heck, the broken toaster in the kitchen doesn’t suddenly come back to life.
    Levity aside, and I do know better, my whole point here is that all these very well composed and authored religious diatribes can get pretty complex in their “arguments/opinion”. It just bothers me a bit when I have to fall back on the “Oh well, nicely written, but I am sure this means something to someone, somewhere.”

    My thoughts on this post having read it about six times? One of the complexities of religion is that of finding a common language to explain the text. We are taught to “fear” God.. yet we are not supposed to accept that “fear” as being literal fear… but more like an “acknowledgement” or something. Yet we are also taught that God can be a “vengeful” God.. but that’s not to be taken literally either… so “fear” and “vengeful” are not accurate in describing God yet great floods, pestilence and plagues are reflecting of God’s displeasure. My point here is not the context of what the Bible means but rather the language tends to create it’s own confusion.

    Like

    • ColorStorm says:

      Not a bad commentary Doug. Can’t spend too much time replying now, but I think my last post more aptly covers your concerns; and valid concerns they are.

      Your time is quite the compliment so tks. Btw, break up your paragraphs and u won’t go to moderation, a WP thing.

      Like

    • Citizen Tom says:

      @Doug

      The are various problems we run into when we are trying to understand the Bible.
      1. We should pray for understanding. The Holy Spirit is still at work. He illuminates the text for us. If you read the Bible already convinced that it is not true, you will probably remain convinced the Bible is not true.
      2. We have to use decent, modern translations. The King James is wonderful literature, but is not especially easy to understand something that was written that long ago. Modern translations may be literal or they may restate the Bible in a way the translator thinks it would have been written today. The latter sort of translation is more of a commentary than a translation.
      3. We have to realize the Book was written for us, not to us. If you want to under a book, you have to put yourself in the shoes of the person the author expected to read the Book. When God inspired the books of the Bible, He did not change that rule.
      4. We have to treat the various types of literature in the Bible appropriately. The Bible contains historical accounts, journals, prophecies, parables, poetry, letters,…
      5. We have to be prepared to work at it. Nothing worthwhile is easy, but it can be fun. If you are serious about trying to understand the Creator, then you may as well expect to be at it for all eternity.

      What does it mean to fear God? I was afraid of my father, especially when I was naughty. Get the picture?
      => https://www.ligonier.org/blog/what-does-it-mean-fear-god/

      Liked by 1 person

      • Doug says:

        Well, Tom… I am not worthy enough to argue the Bible itself. It’s not my place nor do I have anything to prove to anyone one way or the other. As I have gotten older I am more wondering why organized religion must be so complex, and why must the Bible, the Koran, et al, all written eons ago in human terms, using language of the day, can be interpreted so widely. I mean.. why does there even have to be a King James Version anyway? While at least that was a contemporary attempt to make the Bible understandable at that time… I ask, why? If the original version is so.. authentic.. then who decides down the line it needs revision… and by what deity is the revision being made.. and also, by whose authority does anyone decide to use it?

        Regarding “fear”, Luther’s “servile” or “filial” differential seems to be simply a subjective shift from physical fear to emotional fear. To those of us who wish to please our parents in doing the things we do in life are simply acting in a form of conditioned response from childhood. When we were young we did what our parents told us to do or we got their wrath in whatever form that was, presumably as their way of teaching us right from wrong. As we got older and became adults their displeasure in what we might do was more about moral actions, inactions, or unfulfilled expectations on their interpretation and their wrath more about emotional displeasure. The end result is still fear of consequence in some form. Respect can be achieved based on direct fear of alternative consequences of non-respect. Respect can also be achieved by earning trust. The trust in God is based on faith of eternal life. In the meantime, apparently, we do what He says out of some level of fear.
        If that’s what it is, then that’s what it is.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Citizen Tom says:

          @Doug

          Christianity is not very complex. If you read one of the Gospels (Most recommend the Book of John.), then you know the basics of the Christian faith.

          There are people who have never owned a Bible (who cannot even read) whose faith is greater than mine. Why? They have depended upon God, and they have discovered that He is faithful.

          So why do we study? If you love someone, then you want to know all you can about them, what pleases them. The more we learn about God the more wonderful we learn that He is.

          God created everything. He is infinite. There is more to Him than you or I can ever know. The Bible does not tell us everything about God. It does not answer all our questions. It just tells those of us lucky to have the opportunity to read the Bible what we need to know.

          Some people study Creation — are scientists — because they hope to learn more about the Creator by studying what He has made.

          What about fear? What is required to eliminate it?

          1 John 4:18 English Standard Version (ESV)
          18 There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. For fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not been perfected in love.

          I suspect you would enjoy reading that passage in context. Check out 1 John 4:7-21.

          Like

      • ColorStorm says:

        Good stuff Tom- I would only add that the so called ‘elusiveness of understanding scripture’ may be in direct proportion to our ‘desire’ to understand, and the effort required.

        You pretty much said the effort is well worth the time. Many good people have agreed for thousands of years, as the human heart does not change.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Good post. Reminds me of the book of Job. Love that, “fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.” That can be so misunderstood, but really it’s just a simple matter of engaging in some intellectual humility. Since WE didn’t hang the stars in the sky, there’s a slight possibility that God knows more than we do. If God knows more than us, then we should surrender and become teachable. Chuckling here, but tragically some of us don’t get that. It makes us really foolish and unwise.

    I try to bite my tongue,I try not to get too impatient with those who aren’t speaking the language. Spiritual things really are foolishness to some who just don’t have an ear to hear yet. I just mention it because it’s incredible, astounding how once we begin to see, we really do all speak the same language.

    Liked by 3 people

    • ColorStorm says:

      Your reference to Job, (because I did too, lol) is a timeless conversation, and one not uncommon to thoughtful souls, that is, ‘where were you….. when I the Creator, did such and things? Answer if you can!!!’

      And u are correct, this should zip the lip, immediately. But like always, its the punk knowitall kindergarten kid (you know the type, the one with the most annoying parents who have groomed him as a mini adult) who lectures the teacher. Cant stand that stench.

      Same story today. But patience? At least Job and his friends gave God the courtesy of existing, so unlike modern day fools who look in the mirror and see god. So how low has man evolved? Ha! The godless only need to watch the nightly news, and see that yes, people do good things, at the same time people do some tremendously evil things, just as the good book proves.

      But yes, without God in the mix, we are but dunces pretending to dance to non existent music; at least as believers we are sanctified dunces msb. 😉

      Liked by 3 people

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