And now a word from our sponsor

We interrupt the regular offence and defense of the word of God……(note the spelling) and the usual candor without apology for all things good and pure, of which God and His word are the source, to just chit and chat, about this and that, with emphasis on that.

The more one blogs, the easier it is for some to ‘find fault’ with us, because we lay bare what moves us, what is in us, how we think, why we think, what we find sweet, what we find bitter, and truth be told, someone may agree with me or you 99% of the time, but decide one day to say ‘adios’ because we say ONE thing that moves a mountain, one thing that is seemingly so unsettling that we put our proverbial fingers in our ears because the trumpet sound is annoying.

How can he think that, after being so spot on regarding everything else? How can he believe John was exiled to Patmos yet not believe the Lord Himself rode a donkey? How can she believe Paul was shipwrecked yet not believe Joseph was thrown into a pit? How can he believe God created the Seas, yet not believe He created the great whales? Well I never, goodbye!

How can He believe that Christianity is virtuous while remain a Democrat, or how can he as a believer support Kennedy, Reagan, Clinton, or Trump?

It’s easy. All are not at the same mile marker today, and what one loves today, he may despise tomorrow. So then, how do we then trade thoughts and affections with they whose ideas we despise today?

There is great conversation regarding the depths of the oceans and how we are clueless as to what lies below; equally there is the same intellectual dynamic regarding what is above us, and I dare say, we are even more clueless than the 1% we pretend to know.

Time. Space. Matter. Yeah, clueless, and Universities of higher learning which leave out the Creator are the greatest offenders. They do not KNOW. Apart from God, they CANNOT know. You would be hard-pressed to hear a lecture from a blind man describe the color green, being blind from birth. Theories. Assumptions. Bias. Point made. Case closed.

Which brings me to this. I so enjoy cosmological discussions with they who disagree with me, because it forces me to examine my points, and it demands that others consider whether they have been spoon fed dogma, and whether it passes the smell test as to what is real, observable, testable, and repeatable.

But I find it cold-hearted and even more callous to hear the charges that a believer is a wolf in sheep’s clothing, or a devil that wears Pluto……..or somehow insane because he does not tow party line as to the consensus of where we live as humans, ie, on this place known as terra firma, and what in the world this earth is doing, CURRENTLY, from the vantage point called science.

Dear friend, neighbor, and friendly enemy of the gospel, what does this mean to you:

‘Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.’ So saith God.

What is heaven above? What is in the earth beneath? And what is the water UNDER the earth? Worth repeating and contemplating to be sure.

IN heaven above.

IN the earth beneath.

IN the water UNDER the earth.

I say without reservation that God knows more of His own creation than a thousand Tysons, Einsteins, Nyes, Copernicus, Krauss, etc etc, combined, but more important, to the believer I ask: do you take your cues from them, or do you somehow think God’s word lacks? But to the spirit of this post, I would encourage us, each and every one, to examine ourselves, and test whether our worldview has the approval of heaven, or if we have eaten the mildewed bread of godless science which is only a placebo for intellect.

But more. If I do not think you lunatic (moon crazed) then why cannot you assign equal dignity to they with whom you vehemently disagree? I say test all things. Prove all things. And btw, fellowship is much more than differences of opinion, still we both cannot be right, be both can be wrong, and therein is the test of our spiritual mettle.

Have a great new year.

 

 

 

 

About ColorStorm

Blending the colorful issues of life with the unapologetic truth of scripture, while adding some gracious ferocity.
This entry was posted in God and science and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to And now a word from our sponsor

  1. sklyjd says:

    “I so enjoy cosmological discussions with they who disagree with me, because it forces me to examine my points, and it demands that others consider whether they have been spoon fed dogma, and whether it passes the smell test as to what is real, observable, testable, and repeatable.”

    If you could remove your head from the restrictive pages of the Bible my friend, I would believe you, however I know without asking that is impossible.

    Happy new year to you on this young flat planet.

    Like

    • ColorStorm says:

      Really Steve? That’s your trouble. If you can’t take me at my word, surely that explains why u have no use for One greater.

      If you were the only person on earth- it would be impossible for u to arrive at your conclusions- even if u were a ‘natural born scientist’ Why?

      Because man left to himself without the crutches of others would not be so easily fooled.

      But u are a careless reader also. I have never used the words FLAT, YOUNG, or PLANET. They are words that YOU have assigned. It is YOU who is guilty of the false narrative.

      To be fair, if I was the only person alive, and I was unaided by people with science or scripture books, my conclusions would be in harmony with common sense and reality.

      Water.
      Mountains.
      Birds.
      Oceans.
      Rivers.
      Streams.
      Lakes. They all tell the truth, and I suggest you study vids or visit the Himalayas and be humbled by Everest.

      Oh wait/ humility is not a virtue that is found in the playbook of atheism right? It it were, at least u would give God the courtesy of existing.

      And while I’m here, the earth is unique- not one of 9 wandering stars- but one of one. It’s kind of obvious.

      Liked by 1 person

      • sklyjd says:

        “To be fair, if I was the only person alive, and I was unaided by people with science or scripture books, my conclusions would be in harmony with common sense and reality.”

        I agree CS, in fact that is exactly what the ancients thought. As they naturally sought to find answers regarding the natural world and had no scientific understanding it was therefore common sense and reality for them that it must be the result of gods and if they worshiped these gods with prayer and sacrifice rewards would be bestowed upon them, just as the illogical and superstitious still believe today.

        Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          And yet it is the height of common sense to recognize that God is- and that for His pleasure all thing are, and that in Him, we move and have our being.

          Only a lack of reality bows at the feet of atheism. That’s what I mean when I say ‘fair.’

          Liked by 1 person

    • Citizen Tom says:

      @sklyjd

      Few people spend much time in the Bible these days. I doubt that even our host spent much time in it until he reached adulthood. Yet almost all of us spent hours every day growing up learning what we were taught in the public schools. Even private schools spend the vast majority of their time instructing children in beliefs that have little to do with the Bible.

      Still — because of the restrictive pages of the Bible — you don’t believe ColorStorm. Perhaps that is because almost no one gets fed more “ism” nonsense than a child attending a public school.

      Liked by 1 person

      • sklyjd says:

        Tom, I do not know how your public schooling was. Mine was a very long time ago when we had 40 or 50 pupils to a teacher, and not very good teachers I might add due mostly to their training.

        I failed to make the grade and have had to use mostly physical abilities and talents rather than an educated brain to make a dollar. I was schooled in New Zealand and I do not recall any such “ism nonsense” and we were in the political grips of “reds under the beds” Nonsense at this time.

        I now live in Australia and have had my daughter attend all her schooling here. I have been very interested in the teachers and what was taught and I have mostly been impressed. The last two years of her schooling were a little disappointing however due to a couple of her favorite subjects being withdrawn. She was never taught that any ideology was better than any other, but sure enough they were exposed to ideologies but not even close to being indoctrinated as your comments seem to suggest.

        I don’t know much about your schooling system but if you are bitter that science is taught rather than creationism I feel sorry for you because it is knowledge that man will always thirst for. Similar I guess to eating from the Biblical forbidden tree of knowledge, whereas knowledge cannot and will never be subdued by superstition unless of course ruled by a theocracy.

        Like

        • Citizen Tom says:

          @sklyjd

          Am I trying to hold myself up as a world authority on education or some sort of education tyrant? No. I finished high school almost 50 years ago. Now I worry about the education of my grandchildren, and I encourage my children to be careful of the public school system. Still, my children’s children is my children’s responsibility. I can help them, but I cannot tell them what to do. I don’t have that right. I don’t even have the right to use the government to force my “isms” on other people’s children.

          If you are happy with the way your children are being educated, that is not my problem. I just don’t want my tax dollars being misused to indoctrinate other people’s children. I especially don’t want my money used to teach children beliefs their parents abhor.

          What is the problem with a Socialist education system? When we receive services from the government we lose the right to be choosy.

          Consider. Most of the restrictions on our behavior stem from custom, not law. How is custom enforced? Through ostracism.

          America’s Constitution protects our right to associate with the people with whom we want to associate, that is, our right to discriminate in our choice of associates. This right is to principal tool we use to hold each other accountable. When a neighbor’s behavior becomes unpleasant or intolerable, we stay away from that neighbor.

          When we implement Socialism, we lose the right to associate freely with the people with whom we want to associate, especially with respect to our business and charitable relationships. That is why America’s Liberal Democrats constantly portray any sort of discrimination in the most horrifying way. Discriminate against corrupt people? As Greta Thunberg would say, “how dare you?”

          Like

        • sklyjd says:

          Ok fair enough Tom, you encourage your children to be careful of the public school system.

          “I just don’t want my tax dollars being misused to indoctrinate other people’s children.”

          “I especially don’t want my money used to teach children beliefs their parents abhor.”

          How can that be? Unless you home school you are subject to the curricula that is in place, minorities cannot otherwise dictate any preferences and that is good policy. Catholics have catholic schools, Jewish schools and many other types exist, so what really is the problem, religions are catered for, what indoctrination are you on about?

          If you are on about science you are way out of touch of what today’s children and many parents want them to learn. With science the children may go out in the world to be great leaders of technology and may even go on to save the human race from destroying our planet and ourselves.

          I cannot help but realise your political applications to everything you mention and I think it is a lead weight to the discussion. Political stuff always gets in the way, but of course nothing is ever perfect and it never will be, if you take anything to seriously it will simply turn you into a grumpy old man, something I try to avoid as a man of a similar age to yourself.

          Like

        • Citizen Tom says:

          @sklyjd

          Political discourse always gets in the way of those who support the status quo, except when they want still more to have things their way.

          When politicians take our money from us and then use that money to educate our children, are our children now their children? Is it actually wise to trust politicians to pick our children’s teachers and the material that those teachers will teach? Who in their right mind trusts politicians any more than they must? That is, you may have what you think you want, but to whose advantage? Yours? Nope!

          Frankly, I would rather not give money to politicians for educational purposes, but most Americans differ. So, I advocate a compromise, school choice, letting parents decide who teaches their children and what they are taught. Since politician-run schools don’t work especially well, school choice is slowly catching on. Therefore, I am happy with the idea.

          The point is to educate children, not to fund public employees unions. The money we use to educate children should follow the children, not go to failing schools and special interests.

          Romans 12:16 New King James Version (NKJV)

          16 Be of the same mind toward one another. Do not set your mind on high things, but associate with the humble. Do not be wise in your own opinion.

          Is the objective of the education system to allow people who think they are real smart to tell the humble what to believe? No? Then what is wrong with letting parents choose? You are not pro-choice?

          Does being of the same mind require politicians to indoctrinate our children, or does it involve the hard work of striving for understanding and a willingness to live and let live? That is, loving our neighbor.

          Liked by 2 people

        • sklyjd says:

          “Is it actually wise to trust politicians to pick our children’s teachers and the material that those teachers will teach?”

          The educational system we have is possibly not used as much as a political football as yours. We often have both major political parties agreeing on certain issues before changes are made. Our system of democracy has periods of right and left wing government policies and this process often naturally brings many of the policies into the center.

          I do not believe political influence to be directly driving the education system here and they do not run our schools in any real sense of the word, they hold the purse strings of course and our current Prime Minister is cutting his own throat through a huge funding inequality of private and public school funding and of course climate change, especially as he has gone on holidays while large parts of the countries forests and homes burn.

          “Frankly, I would rather not give money to politicians for educational purposes,”

          Yes in an ideal world, however more people would say they do not want their tax money spent on weapons of war, health, welfare or on space rockets etc. The problem with all schools being private without a central curriculum and any financial controls many children would not be educated in the basics, teacher quality may suffer and many facilities would likely close down due to a lack of pupils or unrealistic fees or substandard facilities etc.

          “The point is to educate children, not to fund public employees unions.”

          I would assume the teachers would have their union fees drawn from their own salaries as they do here, it is hard to believe the government funds the unions, are you sure they do?

          “Then what is wrong with letting parents choose? You are not pro-choice?”

          At high schools the children and parents do get to choose the subjects they study, is that not the case there?

          “Does being of the same mind require politicians to indoctrinate our children, or does it involve the hard work of striving for understanding and a willingness to live and let live?”

          Not sure what you mean here Tom, an established ideology is a requirement for real indoctrination, but educational requirements, standards and attitudes are subjective issues that would create complete chaos if thousands of political, social and religious groups were to demand an input into education.

          Like

        • Citizen Tom says:

          @sklyjd

          The educational system we have is possibly not used as much as a political football as yours. We often have both major political parties agreeing on certain issues before changes are made.

          Oh! You are so much better than us! What are we supposed to do, bow down and worship at your feet?

          Stop and think. The United States is a federation. We have 50 states, and those states are quite diverse. In addition, we have local governments within each state. The public school system in this country is run primarily at the state and local level. So do I need to go to Australia to see how the public school system can work in different ways? Of course not.

          The United States may not have invented the public school system, but it took off like a rocket here, and it worked for awhile. That is mostly because local governments competed because the schools were run by local government, and public employee unions had yet to become going concerns. Now the Federal Government is trying to take over.

          At high schools the children and parents do get to choose the subjects they study, is that not the case there?

          After Henry Ford started making cars, he supposedly said customers could have any color car they wanted so long as it is black. Then he started getting competitors. If you refuse to see the advantage of competition, I cannot make you see it. Still, that’s a foolish response.

          Not sure what you mean here Tom, an established ideology is a requirement for real indoctrination, but educational requirements, standards and attitudes are subjective issues that would create complete chaos if thousands of political, social and religious groups were to demand an input into education.

          So, let’s appoint a dictator and be done with it?

          Liked by 2 people

        • sklyjd says:

          “Oh! You are so much better than us! What are we supposed to do, bow down and worship at your feet?”

          Probably a good idea, like most countries including ourselves we do not learn from others. I only explained about the role of federal politics in our system because we also have state and local level governance so we do not differ by much in that respect.

          I do not see any advantage in competition when it comes to educating young people. Take a quick look at the corporate world, the greed and corruption that equals any standard government and work out the pitfalls for yourself.

          Not so long ago the Queensland state government allowed my daughters high school to manage their own funding. The first thing to happen in 2017 was that some subjects such as art and accounting were cut from the curriculum and a handful of sub-standard teachers were employed. My daughter was upset as both subjects were her favorites, but not as much as she was amazed that one of the new IT teachers who was past the age of retirement hardly knew how to use a computer and she had to show him how to disable his anti-virus program. She was hugely disadvantaged, no two ways about it.

          Our system is as much open to political interference, greed and corruption as yours, however I do not agree that complete privatisation is the answer. I only take a look at our energy industry to see that if the companies were not regulated by the government we would be paying double for our electricity.

          The world has gone through this privatisation of public facilities debate time and time again. No system is better than the other but we must keep those who are in control accountable for their actions as much as we can.

          Like

        • Citizen Tom says:

          @sklyjd

          First you say this.

          I do not see any advantage in competition when it comes to educating young people. Take a quick look at the corporate world, the greed and corruption that equals any standard government and work out the pitfalls for yourself.

          Then you observe.

          I do not see any advantage in competition when it comes to educating young people. Take a quick look at the corporate world, the greed and corruption that equals any standard government and work out the pitfalls for yourself.

          That is a perfectly good example of why competition is necessary. When a product or service provider cannot get his act together, we can go to one of his competitors.

          Does private industry provide a perfect solution through competition? Nope. Some activities, like utilities, are natural monopolies. So, government has to regulate utilities rather intensely.

          Because government has to regulate private industry, we must constantly monitor politicians and industry for signs of crony capitalism. Crony capitalism is really just an intermediate step to Socialism.

          Like

  2. Tricia says:

    I like how you worded this ColorStorm, “I so enjoy cosmological discussions with they who disagree with me, because it forces me to examine my points, and it demands that others consider whether they have been spoon fed dogma, and whether it passes the smell test as to what is real, observable, testable, and repeatable.”

    It can be very difficult to be open to being wrong and learning from others when discussing things with someone you vehemently disagree with. It’s really the number one problem I’d say in our culture right now. I have my own issues with this which I’m trying to be better about. Thanks for the thoughtful post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • ColorStorm says:

      I just think T. that we as humans rely on other people’s thinking when we have really not thought about it ourselves- kind of like watching others eat a restaurant and swear we are benefactors of their nutrition.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Colorstorm,
    Great post,

    In My Opinion

    We need two points of view to be expressed and discerned by people willing to listen to each other.

    All the news and social media professing their single-minded opinions only create divisiveness.

    If you want an example of a single minded ranting news “performance” to cause you to want to vomit. I recommend you try to listen to the screaming, ranting, on The View.

    I wonder how long you will endure before you either vomit or throw a shoe at your TV..

    Sad,

    Regards and goodwill blogging.

    Liked by 1 person

    • ColorStorm says:

      SW

      While I may not actually vomit when watching such scratchy and annoying people as Behar etc, who cannot fairly with intelligence judge a matter, that doesn’t mean I don’t want to!!

      That said, we have an advantage when we for example watch CNN or FOX with opposite views/ this creates a more balanced and sober mind- when we can gather the evidence and see through the circus- Solomon like if you will.

      We can then say ‘cut the baby in half!’ without fear of repercussion from the lazy minded who would charge us with such harsh words- but revealing wisdom for concern of the mother and baby.

      I agree though- the jezebels of the world can be seen and smelled 19 states away.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Colorstorm,

    Problem though with two separate news media limited opinions is viewers who choose what channels to tuneor listen become isolated or more easily influenced or controlled by either side or opinions.

    Remember when Soloman ruled to cut the baby in half, both mothers would have shared equally the baby…. (views, opinions, ideas, solutions,)

    What we have now have are two distinct divisions neither hearing nor listening to each other.

    Regards and goodwill blogging

    Liked by 1 person

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